Orgazmo


          I have mixed feelings about the television series SOUTH PARK.
  For the one person who may be unaware of this cult hit, it is a crudely
  animated (the production looks like construction paper cutouts), scatological
  story about the adventures of four third graders in Colorado, one of whom
  generally meets an untimely end sparking cries of "Oh my God! They've
  killed Kenny! You bastards!" The episodes I've watched veer wildly from
  amusing (notably the Emmy-nominated episode about Big Gay Al and his
  Big Gay Boat Ride) to the disgusting (i.e., the Christmas episode featuring
  Mr. Hankey, a dancing turd.) So when I heard that one of the brains behind
  the show had written, directed and starred in a movie about a Mormon who
  finds success as the lead in a pornographic movie, I wasn't sure what
  to expect. Would it be as crude and possibly inflammatory as the TV show
  or would it be a disappointment? Imagine my surprise when it proved to be
  an amusing amalgam of 50s romantic movies, martial arts films and
  sophomoric humor.

          ORGAZMO opens with comic book-style credits, introducing the title
  character, a superhero who carries a laser beam that induces pleasure
  which he deploys as a means of defeating the bad guys. We then meet
  our hero, the innocuously named Joe Young (Parker), a Mormon missionary
  assigned to proselytize in the Hollywood. Doors are slammed, sweet little
  old ladies curse at him, and guard dogs attack him. When he calls at the
  home of Maxx Orbison, a porno producer, Young displays his martial arts
  abilities, impressing the producer. (That Young is handsome doesn't hurt
  either.) Orbison makes him an offer — play the title role of Captain
  Orgazmo in the film being shot and Young can earn a bundle of money,
  enough to marry his sweetheart back in Utah. Torn, Young thinks it over
  and agrees as long as he doesn't actually have to engage in sex (a stunt
  double is used).

          Once he has become Captain Orgazmo, Young is befriended by actor
  Ben Chapleski (Dian Bachar), a diminutive budding scientist who plays his
  sidekick who finds new and "interesting" uses for sex toys. Chapleski freely
  admits he's in porn for the women but his heart is really in inventing — and
  in fact, he has developed his own "oragasmorator". Soon the pair are
  involved in a convoluted life imitates art scheme, taking on a gang of thugs
  who are harassing a local sushi restaurant owner. What Joe Young didn't
  count on was the phenomenal success of the video
ORGAZMO and as he
  tries to leave the world of porn, he finds it is not as easy as he thinks.

          The humor in the film is not as low-brow as
SOUTH PARK and not
   all the jokes are winners, but the film has an almost sweet tone to it.
  Parker and company have chosen a style of playing that walks the fine
  line between farce and outrageousness, but because the actors are
  so committed to their roles, the audience goes with it. Somehow the
  MPAA saw fit to slap the film with an NC-17 rating. There are one or
  two scenes of simulated sex that are no more wild than one sees on cable
  television and other films set in the porn industry (chiefly,
BOOGIE NIGHTS)
  avoided the NC-17 label. The only real nudity are male rear ends so the
   rating must simply be a result of the appearance of sex toys in certain
   scenes — a penis, even if it is made of plastic, must be the offensive
  material. Otherwise, this is a pleasant little satire that plays like a cross
  between the 1960s
BATMAN and THE GREEN HORNET (with their campy
  fight scenes), a bad Bruce Lee movie and a saccharine love story where
  the good guys triumph. For me, the biggest surprise was Parker. He has
  the making of a capable leading actor (something not displayed the dreadful
    BASEKETBALL). Handsome, bleached blond with a goofy charisma,
  Parker carries this frothy concoction and invests so much into the film that
  you can't help but surrender to it and go along for the ride.
ORGAZMO
    
is no prize-winner but it is a delightful comedy.

                          Rating:                C+
                          MPAA Rating:        NC-17
© 2005 by C. E. Murphy. All Rights Reserved.